Upper Cross Syndrome

This could be you? To be honest we all have to a degree, and I would like to mention it just briefly.

If you stand yourself or your partner, up against the wall with your back to the wall and your feet just 2/3 inches away, you should be able to get you back, from the base of your spine up through your entire torso and the back of your head to almost meet with the wall. Try it…

If you find that when your lower back comes close to the wall and your shoulders lift off, or when you put the shoulders back and in contact with the wall, it leaves a big gap at your lower back, you are probably someone who has the above.

Is it bad? No, not necessarily, but it can lead to many problems and you may be suffering with its negative effects now. Because of the rotation it causes in the shoulder girdle, it can cause tension headaches, dizziness, shoulder pain, pain when lifting the arm, numbness in the fingers, pain in the upper back between the shoulder blades (scapula), to name a few.

Is it easily rectified? With education and a little hard work and dedication, in most cases it is! The cross (X) part refers to the muscles being tight in one section of the cross and loose in the other, therefore creating an imbalance in the way we function in the upper torso.

If we move and posture incorrectly for a long time this causes the body to compensate and over use one set of muscles and renders the opposing muscles inactive. To improve the situation, you need to first become aware of what is occurring and then set about correcting it, by stretching the tight set of muscles and then strengthening the weak (loose) set.

Simple? It really is! But you will need someone who is a specialist in anatomy and movement to help you to build a plan to correct it.

If you are suffering with any of the above, clinic and posture are my passion and I would love to help. There, so now you know a little about upper cross syndrome and how to test for it.

Love and energy,
Liz and Jessica x

Spring into Action

Back pain Versus Gardening

It is that time of year when we are excited about the prospect of getting out in the garden, being creative, feeling free and alive and fearing the outcomes of over doing it. Every year the same things crop up and it is a lucrative time for the back manipulator. But does it really have to be that way?

Having spent a long (certainly this year) winter indoors and many hours sitting for whatever reason, computer, sofa, chatting, it is time to get physical again! So let’s get to it, in a much more informed way. Don’t just march out into the garden and tackle it full on for 8 hours!!!

A few basic exercises could help warm you up ready to start, maybe a brisk walk around the block first to get the blood flowing through your system, just 5 minutes or so. Then some simple joint mobilisations, ankle and shoulder rotations, knee and hip flexion and extension ( sit down and stand up a few times) gentle looking from side to side with your head to warm up the neck and then simple side bends, keeping the body straight, with soft knees.

These few exercises before you start and thinking about how you will position yourself whilst working, the body/back doesn’t like to be static, so changing your posture regularly and taking breaks every hour, will ensure that your body isn’t being misused and if you feel discomfort, stop stretch and take a break.

Sounds too simple, that’s why nobody does it! But looking after “you” doesn’t need to be complicated!

Love and energy,
Liz and Jessica x